Cupping

Cupping refers to an ancient Chinese practice in which a cup is applied to the skin and the pressure in the cup is reduced (by using change in heat or by suctioning out air), so that the skin and superficial muscle layer is drawn into and held in the cup.  In some cases, the cup may be moved while the suction of skin is active, causing a regional pulling of the skin and muscle (the technique is called gliding cupping).

Cupping is applied by acupuncturists to certain acupuncture points, as well as to regions of the body that are affected by pain (where the pain is deeper than the tissues to be pulled).

In some cases, a small amount of blood letting (luoci; vein pricking) is done first, using a pricking needle, and then the cup is applied over the site.  The pricking is usually done with a three-edged needle, applied to a vein, and it typically draws 3–4 drops of blood (sometimes the skin on either side is squeezed to aid release of blood).  A standard thick-gauge acupuncture needle or plum blossom needle may be used instead.  This technique is said to promote blood circulation, remove stasis, and alleviate swelling and pain.  It is employed especially when there is a toxic heat syndrome and for a variety of acute ailments.

Cupping is great for relieving musical tension & pain, releasing toxins, & promoting blood circulation by breaking up adhesions that can form between muscle & fascia layers. Most people find this procedure enjoyable, relaxing, & pain free. There can be some soreness the next day, similar to a massage. It is recommended to drink a lot of water to flush the toxins from the body before & after cupping.

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